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14 Perfect Potato Starch Substitutes To Enhance Your Flavor

Potato starch is a very versatile ingredient you’ll often find listed as a requirement for many dishes ranging from baked pastries to savory soups.

However, it’s not one of those ingredients you typically have stocked up in your pantry.

So, most times, when you actually need to use it, you may not have it on hand. That’s why we’ve put together the best substitutes you can use when you don’t have potato starch.

What Is Potato Starch?

Potato starch is a starch powder made by extracting starch from potatoes. It is gluten-free and essentially flavorless, which is why it is gaining popularity as a versatile ingredient that can be used for a wide range of things.

It is a common ingredient in gluten-free baking and can also be used for frying or as a thickening agent in soups and sauces.

Now, let’s find a substitute you can use when you don’t have it on hand.

Nutritional Value Table

SubstitutesCalories
Arrowroot Flour457
Tapioca Starch130
Corn Starch381
Rice Flour366
Mochiko Flour110
Water Chestnut Flour364
Potato Flour357
Quinoa Flour200
Kudzu Starch 33
Wheat Flour364
Instant Mashed Potatoes140
Coconut Flour60
Flax Seeds 534
Ground Matzo130

1. Arrowroot Flour

Arrowroot flour is a starch powder made from the dried roots of different tropical plants.  It is gluten-free and works well as a substitute for potato starch.

It is commonly used as a thickening agent for many sauces and soups, but it can also be incorporated into baked desserts. 

However, if you are using arrowroot flour as a thickening agent, it is best to either at it the end of the cooking process or cook the dish on low heat.

This is essential because arrowroot tends to lose its thickening ability when cooked at high temperatures for too long.

How To Substitute

Use two teaspoons of arrowroot flour for each tablespoon of potato starch required in a dish.

2. Tapioca Starch

Tapioca starch is another great substitute you can use in place of potato starch. It is obtained from the roots of the cassava plant, and it is most known for its incredible thickening and binding ability.

Like most starches, tapioca flour has no detectable flavor. So, you can add it to any recipe that calls for potato starch, from soups to baked bread and pastry doughs.

However, when using tapioca starch, you’ll need to start with a small quantity first and then work your way up because it can easily form clumps if you use too much at once.

How To Substitute

Start with half a teaspoon of tapioca starch and then add more.

3. Corn Starch

Corn starch is an excellent substitute for potato starch. It is a very versatile and easily accessible ingredient that most people likely already have in their kitchen.

It is made from the endosperm of corn and is generally gluten-free.

You can use it to thicken soups or fry different foods, but it also works well for gluten-free baking. 

Just like potato starch, it doesn’t have any flavor of its own, so you can use it as a direct replacement without worrying about any changes to the taste of your dish.

How To Substitute

Use a 1:1 ratio when replacing potato starch with cornstarch.

4. Rice Flour

Rice flour is another great replacement for potato starch. It is gluten-free and has very similar properties to potato starch.

However, it works best when paired with cooked dishes. If you want to use it for baking, you’ll need to combine it with other gluten-free flour to get a great texture. 

The taste of rice flour is also very neutral. So, you can add it to soups, sauces, and custards that need thickening.

How To Substitute

Use a 1:1 ratio when replacing potato starch with rice flour.

5. Mochiko Flour

Mochiko flour, also known as sweet rice flour, is a type of rice flour made from short-grain rice. It has a slightly gelatinous texture which regular rice flour does not have, and is slightly sweeter.

Nonetheless, it is another great substitute you can use in place of potato starch.

Due to its sweet taste and sticky texture, mochiko flour is commonly used for baking, but you can also use it for cooking.

How To Substitute

Use a 1:1 ratio when replacing potato starch with mochiko flour.

6. Water Chestnut Flour

Water chestnut flour is a type of flour made from dried water chestnuts. Much Like potato starch, it is actually a starch and not just flour, so it is a great replacement to use as it will result in a similar texture.

Water chestnut flour has a slightly sweet and smoky taste, so it works best with savory dishes like soups and sauces that need thickening. However, you can also use it for frying.

How To Substitute

Use a 1:1 ratio when replacing potato starch with water chestnut flour. You’ll also need to mix it with water first to make a slurry before adding it to your dish. This will reduce the tendency of any lumps in your dish.

7. Potato Flour

Potato flour is another lovely substitute for potato starch. Most people often think the two are the same thing, but potato flour is quite different from potato starch. 

It is made from whole potatoes that have been dried and ground into flour, unlike potato starch which is made by extracting starch from potatoes.

However, the two can be used interchangeably when you’re in a pinch. Potato flour is very versatile and can be used as a thickening agent for savory dishes or combined with other flours for baking. 

How To Substitute

Use a 1:1 ratio when replacing potato starch with potato flour.

8. Quinoa Flour

If you’re looking for a healthy gluten-free substitute, then quinoa flour is a great option you can try. As the name suggests, it is made from blended quinoa flakes and is high in protein and other essential nutrients.

It can be used for baking, frying, and thickening different soups and sauces. 

However, with quinoa flour, you may notice a more straightforward grassy and slightly bitter taste, so you’ll need to be careful with how much you use.

How To Substitute

Use ¾ of a cup of quinoa flour for each cup of potato starch required in a dish.

9. Kudzu Starch

Kudzu starch is starch powder commonly used in Asian cooking. It is made from kudzu root, a very similar plant to arrowroot.

Like potato starch, it does not have any real flavor and is typically used as a thickening agent in soups and for making Japanese sweets

Kudzu is a fantastic substitute for potato starch as it is gluten-free and can be used in any recipe that calls for potato starch.

However, it would be best to mix it with a little bit of cold water first before adding it to your dish.  

How To Substitute

Use a 1:1 ratio when replacing potato starch with kudzu starch.

10. Wheat Flour

Wheat flour is another great substitute you can try.  It is very versatile and can be used for baking, frying, or even thickening soups.

It adds a slightly nutty and warm flavor to anything it is added to, but the taste is very comforting and is unlikely to affect the final result of your dish. 

However, wheat flour is not a great option for gluten-free recipes since it contains a fairly high percentage of gluten. You will also need to double to quantity to get the desired effect of potato starch.

How To Substitute

Use a 2:1 ratio when replacing potato starch with wheat flour.

11. Instant Mashed Potatoes

If you’re in a bind and have instant mashed potatoes on hand, It is a great last-minute substitute you can try. 

It is simply dehydrated mashed potatoes that have been turned into powdery flakes, so it will do a similar job to potato starch. 

It works best in savory dishes like soups, sauces, and gravies, where the potato starch is mainly being used as a thicker.

You’ll also need to pulse the instant mashed potatoes in a food processor to get a smoother consistency.

How To Substitute

Use a 1:1 ratio when replacing potato starch with instant mashed potatoes.

12. Coconut Flour

Coconut flour is a popular ingredient in many gluten-free dishes, so it is undoubtedly an amazing substitute for potato starch. 

However, it does have a slightly sweet taste but once combined with other ingredients, you likely won’t notice the sweetness. 

It can be used for baking or used to thicken soups and sauces. If you are using coconut flour for a baking recipe, you’ll need to reduce the quantity to avoid ending up with an overly dry and hard finished product.

How To Substitute

Use ¾ a cup of coconut flour for each cup of potato starch required when baking. However, if you use it for a sauce or soup, starch with half a teaspoon and add more as needed.

13. Flax Seeds

Flax seeds are very healthy seeds, but most people probably don’t know they are great thickening agents and can be used in baking. 

They are a great substitute for potato starch as they improve the texture of many dishes you’d typically use potato starch for.  

Flax seeds also have a mild nutty taste, but you won’t really notice it once you combine them with all the other ingredients in your dish.

However, you’ll need to use ground flax seeds to get a similar texture to potato starch.

How To Substitute

Use a 1:1 ratio when replacing potato starch with ground flax seeds.

14. Ground Matzo

Ground matzo is another fantastic substitute for potato starch. It is made from matzah, an unleavened bread that is a staple component of Jewish cuisine. 

Ground matzo is typically used in casseroles or fried matzo balls, but it can be used as a binding agent in many baked pastries and can be used to thicken soups and give fried foods a crispy texture.

How To Substitute

Use a 1:1 ratio when replacing potato starch with matzo flour. You can easily make matzah from scratch and then blend it into a powder to save you the stress of having to find it at the grocery store.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I Use Flour Instead Of Potato Starch?

You can use potato flour in place of potato starch if you are mainly using it as a thickening agent or for gluten-free baking.

What Is Potato Starch Used For?

Potato starch is usually used as a thickener and helps to improve the texture of many foods. It is also a common ingredient in gluten-free baking.

Is Cornstarch The Same As Potato Starch?

Corn starch and potato starch are both starch powders used for very similar purposes, but they are not the same. Potato starch is made from crushed potatoes, while cornstarch is made from the endosperm of corn.

Where Do I Find Potato Starch?

You’ll usually be able to find potato starch in most grocery stores. It is typically stocked in the baking aisle.

Should You Refrigerate Potato Starch?

You do not need to refrigerate potato starch. It has a stable shelf life, so it is best stored at room temperature.

Does Potato Starch Make Things Crispy?

Potato starch makes fried foods crispy, but you’ll need to properly coat the food in the starch first before frying.

Is Potato Starch Keto Friendly?

Potato starch is keto friendly and can be consumed on a keto diet because most of the starch it contains is “resistant starch”  that won’t impact your ketone or sugar levels much.

What Does Potato Starch Taste Like?

Potato starch does not have any inherent flavor or taste since it is used more for texture and not taste. It is quite bland and flavorless on its own.

14 Perfect Potato Starch Substitutes To Enhance Your Flavor

5 from 2 votes
Prep Time

40

minutes
Cooking Time

6

minutes
Total Time

46

minutes

Here are some potato starch substitutes that have a thickening effect, and they also make the product easier to work with.

Ingredients

  • Arrowroot Flour

  • Tapioca Starch

  • Corn Starch

  • Rice Flour

  • Mochiko Flour

  • Water Chestnut Flour

  • Potato Flour

  • Quinoa Flour

  • Kudzu Starch

  • Wheat Flour

  • Instant Mashed Potatoes

  • Coconut Flour

  • Flax Seeds

  • Ground Matzo

Directions

  • Choose your favorite substitute from the list given above
  • Follow the directions given in the recipe after having substituted the ingredient in the correct ratio

Recipe Video

Jess Smith