Skip to Content

Are Eggs High In Potassium?

What’s Potassium And Why Is It Important?

Eggs

Potassium is an essential mineral that keeps your heart and brain functioning. You can think of potassium as your body’s crossing guard. Your body and all the systems it houses are constantly working to keep you alive and healthy.

Getting sufficient amounts of potassium is vital to nerve cell health. This helps ensure our cells signal to each other and exchange critical information.

Without this communication, our cells can lose the connections they need. Potassium helps our cells circumvent blocks to promote muscle contraction and other movements.

This allows you to move as needed and maintain proper body temperature. Potassium is also a champion in helping you maintain a consistent heartbeat.

Fruits and veggies contain potassium, but so do milk and eggs. There are several sources of potassium in most households, including:

  • Bananas
  • Broccoli
  • Butternut squash
  • Eggs
  • Poultry
  • Soy products

And that’s only a brief introduction to the massive list of potassium-rich foods! Browse your pantry or raid your fridge and you’ll easily find a plethora of potassium sources.

We’ll compare eggs to other high-potassium sources later. For now, we’re highlighting the remarkable reasons to include eggs in your diet.

3 Reasons Eggs Should Be Your Go-To Breakfast

Eggs

As noted in the quick answer, large eggs contain up to 73 mg of potassium. This is the mineral your body needs to sustain a healthy heart and nerve cell function.

Eggs are also full of protein to keep you fuller longer. But what else do they bring to the table?

1. They’re A Premier Protein Powerhouse

The incredible, edible egg has been a beloved breakfast choice for centuries. Easy to customize as part of omelets, quiches, and scrambles, eggs can truly be whatever you want them to be.

They also boast a protein-packed punch, but that’s not all…

2.  A Good Source Of Vitamins

Eggs are also abundant in an array of vitamins that support eye, skin, and prenatal health. So much so that registered dietician, Rachel Link, refers to them as a superior food source.

The vitamin and nutrient content of eggs includes, but isn’t limited to

  • Biotin: A go-to supplement correlated with hair and nail growth.
  • Choline: An esteemed protector of brain and liver function.
  • Folate: Promotes the production of various blood cells.
  • Phosphorous: Encourages healthy bones and teeth.
  • Riboflavin: Protects your skin and GI tracts.
  • Selenium: An all-start at heart and cancer prevention.
  • Vitamin A: Keeps your eyes healthy.
  • Vitamin B12: Gives you energy.
  • Vitamin D: Keeps bones strong to prevent brittleness.

And each of these vitamins and nutrients does so much more than what’s summarized here! Click this link to discover more details.

3. They Combat Heart Disease

Eggs are a great source of Omega-3 fatty acids. These fatty acids help decrease inflammation, triglycerides, and cholesterol. All of which can have a critical impact on your heart.

Eat a healthy serving of eggs each week, and you might be able to say goodbye to the fish oil supplements for good.

Do Eggs Raise Cholesterol?

Eggs

This topic has spearheaded a lot of controversy over the years. Older generations may avoid eggs based on outdated medical advice, while others may not be aware of the good (HDL) vs. bad (LDL) cholesterol.

Some medical professionals can’t even agree on whether eggs are good or bad. We’ll give you the CliffsNotes version below:

  • The cholesterol concern is a myth — Renowned nutritionist, Jonny Bowden, labels eggs one of the most perfect foods in existence. A passionate egg enthusiast, he’s determined to debunk some myths surrounding eggs. On his blog, he explains why: eggs aren’t just full of vitamins. They’re also full of cholesterol that does not affect the cholesterol found in your blood.
  • The fat in eggs is the heart-healthy kind — Surely, you’ve heard eggs are fatty before. Especially when the line cook coats them in butter and fries them. But eggs on their own? They’re an ample source of monounsaturated fats. This is the kind of fat in avocados, and olive oil nutritionists are always recommending you eat.
  • The yolk is good! — Arguably Bowden’s most passionate plea: don’t toss the yolk! He notes many of the heart-healthy nutrients found in eggs are actually in the yolk. So although egg whites top every fad diet directory, don’t be afraid of yolks.  They yield a large majority of the nutrient content. Eat the whole egg to reap the most nutritional benefits!

RELATED: Is Almond Milk Good For Acid Reflux?

Are Eggs High In Potassium Compared To Other Foods?

While eggs may not be as bountiful in potassium as the acclaimed banana, they still offer a copious quantity. Review the table below to see how they compare to other common foods:

Food (1 cup unless otherwise noted)Highest Level of Potassium (mg)*
Single almond8.76
Cheese (1 oz.)27.8
Mixed-grain toast (1 oz.)62.9
Poached egg66.5
Raw spinach167.4
Raw strawberry232.6
Raw broccoli287.6
Mashed banana805.5
Quinoa1,258

*The data above was taken from an encyclopedia shared by The University of Rochester Medical Center. Please note that vitamin and mineral content can vary across different types of food. Time and temperature must also be considered.

As shown in the table above, eggs offer enough potassium to serve as formidable opponents against heart disease. Even if they can’t compete with a cup of quinoa or a banana.

What Kind Of Eggs Should I Buy?

Of course, budget and availability are factors here, but we recommend free range whenever possible. This means the hens laying the eggs are allowed to wander and live humanely without being limited to a cage.

Although eggs aren’t on the dirty dozen list, we recommend buying organic pasteurized eggs.

How Should I Prepare Eggs?

The real beauty of eggs lies in their versatility. You can enjoy them hard-boiled, soft-boiled, poached, scrambled, sunny side up, and a billion other ways.

They can also be modified to your preference with veggies and meat in an omelet or a sprinkle of your favorite cheese on top. And don’t feel limited to this list! Dr. Axe and his team share their favorite egg recipes here.

How Should I Store Eggs?

In the refrigerator. To help them last longer, Dr. Caudle of the Rowan University School of Medicine, recommends placing them on the bottom shelf.

The bottom shelf is typically the coldest one, which promotes egg longevity. If you’re curious about Dr. Caudle’s other food storage suggestions, explore her tips.

3 Easy Recipes With Eggs

This article is going to be fun for those who love eggs. When we talk about eggs, one may picture the breakfast options they can have.

 But, here we have the real deal: eggs can even be the highlight of busy weekend nights. But, of course, the preparation time is the best thing about eggs other than the taste.

Yet another reason is that they make a great breakfast option.

Other than being a protein powerhouse for which they are famous, eggs are also a good source of potassium. So let us look at the things we can make with eggs.

Quick Table: 3 Delicious Egg Recipes

RecipeCaloriesPreparation Time
Dim’er Kalia170 25 Minutes
Jammy Egg Toasts20025 Minutes
Classic Deviled Eggs
9015 Minutes

1. Dim’er Kalia

Here is a recipe you can go for if you want to make something that has gravy and can go with the eggs.

First, boil the eggs and then split them for the marination to seep in. Use turmeric, red chili powder, and salt for marination. After 10 minutes, fry these eggs until golden brown. 

Take a saucepan to make coarse powder with red chili, cumin, coriander, and fennel seed.

Add garlic ginger paste and onions with the coarse masala powder till it leaves oils.

Add water and curd to this masala to make gravy and mix well. Serve hot!

Calories Per Serving: 170

Preparation Time: 25 Minutes

RELATED: Are Avocados Acidic, And Bad For Acid Reflux?

2. Jammy Egg Toasts

This one is a quick breakfast recipe. In this, you semi-boil the egg, meaning it will not be too hard or not too runny.

Add vinegar, shallot, and thyme with salt and pepper in a small bowl. At the same time, it sits for 10 minutes while taking a saucepan of water and boiling it.

Next, add the eggs and let them simmer for 6 minutes.

Put these eggs in ice or cold water so they stop cooking at once. Next, stir oil and parsley with mustard into a shallot mixture.

Now take the bread and use your favorite spread on it, top it with these eggs and enjoy!

Calories Per Serving: 200

Preparation Time: 25 Minutes

3. Classic Deviled Eggs

The deviled eggs are a classic recipe and easy to make. However, the chances for the dish to turn out good depends on how well the eggs are boiled.

Boil the eggs and let them cool down. Slice the eggs into half to scoop out the yolk in a bowl. Add mayonnaise, Dijon mustard, salt, and some pepper with some vinegar in the bowl.

Take a spoon and put the deviled egg mixture back into the whites. Add a little paprika to it for that extra quirkiness, and they are ready to serve.

Calories Per Serving: 90

Preparation Time: 15 Minutes

Frequently Asked Questions

Are Eggs Good For You?

Yes. The American Heart Association classifies them as an exceptional source of vitamins and protein your body needs. You can read more about their perspective on eggs here.

Are Brown Eggs Or White Eggs Better?

As the old phrase goes: never judge a book by its cover. There has been no evidence of a nutritional or taste difference between brown and white eggs.

The only difference is the color of the shell, and maybe the price tag. Regardless of color, we recommend cage-free pasteurized eggs.

Yolk Or No Yolk?

Yolk! When combined with all the protein egg whites have to offer, the yolk is a magnificent source of extra proteins and vitamins. We encourage everyone to eat the whole egg: whites and yolks.

Are Eggs A Good Source Of Potassium?

Yes. Although they can’t quite compete with some fruits and vegetables, they are a respectable potassium source.

Can Diabetics Consume Eggs?

Yes. Eggs are a low glycemic choice and full of protein your body can utilize to stabilize glucose levels.

Are Eggs Diet Friendly?

Yes. Eggs deliver the protein, vitamins, and nutrients your body needs while also being a low-calorie choice.

What Makes Eggs Pasteurized?

Eggs that have been exposed to heated conditions are pasteurized. This helps destroy and inhibit bacterial growth to ensure safe consumption.

Should I Refrigerate Eggs?

Yes, on the bottom shelf if space allows.

How Should I Cook Eggs?

Any way you want! We’ve included a few different ways in this article. You can discover endless egg recipes that’ll tickle your fancy in this blog post.

How Can I Tell If The Eggs Have Gone Bad?

Use your senses! Mainly your sense of sight and smell. Experts recommend cracking them to see if the yolk appears discolored.

This usually means bacteria have started growing. They also suggest smelling them to check for a sulfuric aroma that can denote spoilage.

Learn More

Curious about the ins and outs of eggs? Check out this video to learn how diet trends have changed and why eggs are so controversial in the nutrition field.

You’ll even see why two cardiologists have differing opinions on eggs. In no time, you’ll be an egg-spert!

3 Easy And Tasty Recipes With Eggs

0 from 0 votes

Find out if eggs are high in potassium and see a list of a few popular egg recipes here.

Directions

  • Pick a recipe from the list above
  • Click the recipe name and visit the website
  • Collect the ingredients and cook the food
  • Enjoy – don’t forget to leave a review

Recipe Video

Notes

Jess Smith